Gesture controlled python robot unicorn (or is it a rhino)

In the previous two post I built and played with a robot unicorn from Do it Kitshttps://doitkits.com/product/robot-unicorn/. In the first post, python was used to get it to move forward, backwards, left, right and stop. The second post discussed using a second microbit to send the movement instructions via the microbit's  radio module.




This post looks at extending the idea to using the accelerometer to pick up directions and send them to the robot unicorn (that still seems weird to write). Microbit's accelerometers, using the x and y directions, provide the inputs and then send the direction commands. The robot unicorn code is the same in the second post, the new code for the gestures is shown below. 




This a work in progress it detects x and y changes together so it does have a tendency to do one direction and then the other. This needs further work.

All my code for the robot unicorn projects can be found at: https://github.com/scottturneruon/Robo_unicorn_python or if you want to cite it : Turner, S., 2017. Robo_unicorn_python. Available at: <Robo_unicorn_python> https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5729583.v7

All opinions in this blog are the Author's and should not in any way be seen as reflecting the views of any organisation the Author has any association with. Twitter @scottturneruon

Radio controlled microbit Robot Unicorn

In a previous post a robot unicorn was built from a kit (Do it Kits https://doitkits.com/product/robot-unicorn/) and controlled to do a fixed sequence of actions. In this post a similar thing will be done, but this time the actions are not fixed within the robot itself, but in response to messages sent from another microbit via the radio module.




Sending


Sends out messages via the microbit's radio module, e.g. fwd for forward or tr for turn right; as well the name of the actions scrolls across the microbit.


On the Unicorn


Revieves messages via the microbits radio module, e.g. bwd for backward or tl for turn left; then carries out the action for 500ms. The time was selected to give the system enough time to finish the action before the next message is expected.




All the code available at Turner, S., 2017. Robo_unicorn_python. Available at: <Robo_unicorn_python> https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5729583.v7

All opinions in this blog are the Author's and should not in any way be seen as reflecting the views of any organisation the Author has any association with. Twitter @scottturneruon

Robot Unicorn, python and a microbit

Yesterday (21/12/2017) I took delivery of a Robot Unicorn kit - now those were three words I don't think I would ever write let alone say from Do it Kits https://doitkits.com/product/robot-unicorn/ based around the microbit.

There is a fantastic video produced by Do It Kits on how to put the kit together and another on programming using Blocks:



Using the second video as a starting point I have produced my version of it in Python (see below). Essentially go forward, backwards, turn left and turn right, as well as pause.

I have probably wired it up back to front, so my settings in the code are the other way around to the ones used in the video - you may need to swap backwards and forwards around; as well as left and right.


This is a cute kit. How can anyone resist a Robot Unicorn?

All of the code available at Turner, S., 2017. Robo_unicorn_python. Available at: <Robo_unicorn_python> https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.5729583.v7

All opinions in this blog are the Author's and should not in any way be seen as reflecting the views of any organisation the Author has any association with. Twitter @scottturneruon